Places in Bangladesh

In a remote village in northern Bangladesh, an amateur archaeologist has discovered the remains of a mosque believed to be built in the 7th century, 69 years after the death, in 632 CE, of the Holy Prophet (saws) himself.
Villagers initially stumbled on the site where they found ancient treasures and artifacts of Islamic history, including a stone with Quranic scripture, buried underground.

Further investigation into the findings could prove the site to be the earliest mosque built in South Asia.

The Sundarbans
Home of the Royal Bengal Tiger & The Largest Mangrove Forest
The Sundarbans are the largest littoral mangrove belt in the world, stretching 80km (50mi) into the Bangladeshi hinterland from the coast. The forests aren't just mangrove swamps though, they include some of the last remaining stands of the mighty jungles which once covered the Gangetic plain. The Sundarbans cover an area of 38,500 sq km, of which about one-third is covered in water. Since 1966 the Sundarbans have been a wildlife sanctuary, and it is estimated that there are now 400 Royal Bengal tigers and about 30,000 spotted deer in the area...

Bangladesh: Islamic Heritage
The culture of Bangladesh is composite and over centuries has assimilated influences of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Islam and Christianity. It is manifested in various forms, including art and craft; folklore and folk tales; languages and literature, philosophy and religion... 

Cox's Bazar, the longest beach in the world
Cox's Bazar is considered as the longest beach in the world, with a total of 121 kilometer length sea beach. The beach is located in the south division of Bangladesh, also known as the Cox's Bazar district. The name Cox's Bazar was derived from its founder, Captain Cox. He founded the very attractive beach in 1798. The Cox's Bazar beach started only as a small port and health resort.

Though the beach is considered to be the longest beach in the world, it has been the least crowded among the other beaches...